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The Best Rig that Many People Asked me About! Iso Fishing Rig.
The Best Rig that Many People Asked me About! Iso Fishing Rig.


Opaleye – Pier Fishing in California

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  • Summary of article content: Articles about Opaleye – Pier Fishing in California Bait and Tackle: Some anglers specialize in opaleye, and many of them swear that moss or frozen peas are the best bait. …
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Opaleye - Pier Fishing in California
Opaleye – Pier Fishing in California

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Tips For Catching Opaleye

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  • Summary of article content: Articles about Tips For Catching Opaleye Opaleye are beautiful fish. Posted by bigworm. Cool, thanks for the tips. Yeah, that’s exactly the rig the guy was using. …
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Tips For Catching Opaleye
Tips For Catching Opaleye

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Opaleye Rig | Bloodydecks

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  • Summary of article content: Articles about Opaleye Rig | Bloodydecks How do you fish for Opaleye? I know they like frozen peas and seaweed from the Asian market, but how do you rig them? …
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    I know they like frozen peas and seaweed from the Asian market, but how do you rig them?
    I’m planning on doing some opal eye…
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Opaleye Rig | Bloodydecks
Opaleye Rig | Bloodydecks

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Opal eye Rig from Jetty

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  • Summary of article content: Articles about Opal eye Rig from Jetty I love all inshore fishing..fun, variety and free! A rig I developed for fishing Opaleye close in to Jetty Rocks to prevent snags: A dropper … …
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Opal eye Rig from Jetty
Opal eye Rig from Jetty

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Learn about the Opaleye

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  • Summary of article content: Articles about Learn about the Opaleye Get fishing info about the Opaleye fish species (Girella Nigricans). … The all-tackle record as of 2019 is at a weight of 4 lbs and 0 oz. …
  • Most searched keywords: Whether you are looking for Learn about the Opaleye Get fishing info about the Opaleye fish species (Girella Nigricans). … The all-tackle record as of 2019 is at a weight of 4 lbs and 0 oz. Get fishing info about the Opaleye  fish species (Girella Nigricans). Check heatmaps where to fish and typical bait. Grows up to 26 inches.Opaleye ,Opaleye fishing
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Guides Who Fish This Species

About the Opaleye (Girella nigricans)

Diet and Size

Interesting facts about the Opaleye

Habitat & Distribution

Opaleye – Fishing Techniques

Learn about the Opaleye
Learn about the Opaleye

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Targetting Opaleye? | San Diego Fishing Forums

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Targetting Opaleye? | San Diego Fishing Forums
Targetting Opaleye? | San Diego Fishing Forums

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See more articles in the same category here: 381+ tips for you.

Pier Fishing in California

Sea Chubs: Family Kyphosidae

Species : Girella nigricans (Ayres, 1860); from the French word girelle (a derivative of julis, an old word used to denote a number of small wrasse in Europe), the Latin word nigr (dark) and the Greek word ikanos (becoming, in reference to its pleasing appearance).

Alternate Names : Blue-eye perch, green perch, opaleye perch, bluefish, blue bass, greenfish, Jack Benny, Catalina perch, button-back, button-eye, and button bass. Called chopa verde in Mexico.

Identification : Opaleye are perch-shaped but heavier bodied. Their coloring is usually dark olive green, usually with two light spots at the base of the dorsal fin; occasionally pale green while some almost all white fish have been observed. Eyes are distinctive: large and an opalescent, blue-green color.

Size : To 26 inches and over 13 pounds. The California angling record fish weighed 6 lbs 4 oz and was taken near Los Flores Creek in Malibu in 1956. Another 6 Lbs 4 oz opaleye was reportedly caught by David Douglas at the Santa Monica Pier in 1964 (Pasadena Independent, January 16, 1964). It was never officially recorded. The diving record fish weighed 13 Lbs 7 oz and was speared by David Williams at Aliso, south Laguna Beach, in 1964. Unfortunately, most opaleye caught from piers are less than 14 inches in length.

Mahageer (Hashem Nahid) and an opaleye from the Cabrillo Mole in Avalon

Range : Gulf of California (isolated population), and Pacific Coast from Cabo San Lucas, southern Baja California, to Otter Rock, Oregon. Common from Bahia Magdalena, southern Baja California, to Point Conception. Less common north of Point Conception and rare north of Monterey.

Habitat : Generally found in intertidal, shallow-water, rocky areas and kelp beds. Recorded to a depth of 105 feet.

Piers : Can be caught from almost any pier in southern California located near rocks, reefs, or kelp. Less common north of Point Conception although taken occasionally at piers in Morro Bay. Uncommon north of Cayucos but a population seems established near the Coast Guard Pier in Monterey. Considered rare north of Monterey. Best bets: Shelter Island Pier, Ocean Beach Pier (inshore), Oceanside Pier, Oceanside Harbor Pier, Dana Harbor Pier, Cabrillo Pier (jetty side), the Green Pleasure Pier and Cabrillo Mole (Avalon), and Paradise Cove Pier. Most of the fish caught at SoCal piers are fairly small to mid-size opaleye. The exceptions are the two piers in Avalon that almost always have good-sized fish available for the opaleye-seekers.

An opaleye I caught at the Cabrillo Mole

Shoreline : One of the main goals of rocky shore anglers in southern California.

Boats : An inshore species rarely taken by boaters unless targeting them at places such as jetties and breakwaters.

Bait and Tackle : Some anglers specialize in opaleye, and many of them swear that moss or frozen peas are the best bait. I’ve actually caught more on ghost shrimp but I must admit that I’ve watched, many a morning, while a group of opaleye “pros” from Los Angeles (I recognize them by now) caught opaleye after opaleye and they almost always use moss as their “bait du jour.” I think all three baits are excellent for opaleye (although the ghost shrimp are more expensive and sometimes hard to find). Fresh mussels, pile worms, bloodworm, and small rock crabs also make good bait. I also managed to hook a few opaleye using garden snails during an experiment testing different baits at Catalina in 2005.

Food Value : A very good eating fish that is mild flavored, small flaked, firm textured, and low in fat content. It is suitable for many forms of cooking but most commonly fried or steamed whole.

Opaleye caught from the rocks on the Palos Verdes Penninsula

Comments : Primarily herbivores (vegetarians), opaleye eat a variety of plants including feather boa kelp, giant kelp, sea lettuce and coralline algae. Evidently they also grab organisms attached to seaweed as they’re making their rounds, tasty little items like tube worms and red crabs. Opaleye are a favorite of many anglers; they’re hard to hook but once hooked put up a very good fight for their size.

The crystal-clear waters at Avalon present quite a challenge for the sagacious, line-shy opaleye. Big schools of 2-4 pound fish hang around the Green Pleasure Pier and the Cabrillo Mole but they can be very hard to catch. They seem more cautious of line at the Green Pleasure Pier but if you use a light line, perhaps 2-4 pound fluorocarbon, you might get them. (Actually, to be fair, I catch them every year at the Pleasure Pier and I usually am using 8-10 fluorocarbon). Of course the 1,794 ropes, tangled lines, pilings and yellow submarines that surround and hang under the GPP might also get your line.

At the Mole it’s the long fronds and blades of the giant kelp that sway (tidally) in or out near the railing. If the opaleye are allowed to encircle the kelp it’s pretty much over. As soon as they are hooked apply pressure and try to keep them coming toward you while having a person ready with a net. You need to use light line but can also pay the consequences if you’re unwilling to apply enough pressure.

Big opaleye from the Cabrillo Mole

The opaleye “pros” who come over to Catalina from Los Angeles take the ferry over for one day, fish exclusively at the Mole, fish for one species—opaleye, and are almost always successful (coolers are crammed with fish). You learn from such experts and a few things should be mentioned.

The first is that the opaleye are typically at a mid-water depth, five to ten feet under the surface of the water depending upon the depth of the water. They are rarely caught on top and infrequently caught on the bottom (although I’ve caught several fishing on the bottom at night and they are often caught on the bottom by anglers casting out from jetties).

Second is that if you want to fish the correct depth a float is desirable and long slip-line floats are the preferred tackle for the opaleye hunters.

Third is when you see the float go down, strike and, as mentioned, try to keep the fish out of the kelp.

Fourth is that light line (preferably fluorocarbon) and small hooks (size 6 or smaller) are key.

Opaleye, especially the older, larger fish can be frustratingly difficult to catch. Chum with peas and a whole school may come up to check out the bait and fish after fish will approach the bait before turning away in seeming disapproval. But, the challenge of outsmarting the fish is part of the fun.

Tips For Catching Opaleye

Date: May 3, 2004

To: Pier Fishing In California Message Board

From: bigworm

Subject: Green peas for opaleye

While I was fishing at the Jetty, I spoke to a guy who had caught very nice looking opaleye. He said he was using green peas and green moss from the rocks as bait. Has anyone ever tried this? He showed me the peas he was using, but I just couldn’t believe it.

Posted by giflet

Those two types of bait have landed me many, many, many opaleye over the years, all of which were caught at Wind and Sea Beach in La Jolla. The green peas produced 75% of the total catch. “You better wear a life jacket when joining this board, cause you can drown in information.”

Minnow Magnet and an opaleye from the Cabrillo Mole

Posted by Kbron2000

Are those canned green peas??? or just fresh green peas????

Posted by giflet

I always used frozen peas.

Opaleye from the Cabrillo Mole

Posted by dompfa ben

Believe it or not, I have completed an extensive study (won 1st place in my high school science fair) on which baits Opaleye prefer. Opaleye are in the nibbler family, and they are omnivorous.

My “research” (high school, albeit, but good nonetheless) found that during the Spring and Summer months, opaleye prefer green peas to all other baits. Their mouths are lightning quick, and they can easily remove the meaty contents of a pea, and leave the skin on the hook.

Tips I have learned: (1) Use frozen peas, not canned peas. (2) Use peas whose skin is intact and void of holes or tears (yeah, it makes a difference!). (3) Use small hooks: size 8 to 12 baitholder hooks. I use Owner Mosquito hooks for these little darlings, and they stick pretty good. (4) Use a casting bobber and LOOONG leader setup. Pinch of shot 6 inches above the hook. (5) Chum! Throw a handful of peas in the water where you’re fishing. I’ve seen opaleye boil off PV using a little chum. (6) Use lighter line–8 or 10 lb. maximum. These guys (especially the bigger models) can be line shy!

Moss, mussel, ghost shrimp, and red shrimp round out the top five baits in my study. All will work, but none are so economical, easy to use, and leave your hands smelling clean and gardeney Plus, if you’re a real sport, you can slam a handful of bait in your mouth and it won’t turn your stomach! It goes without saying, but don’t forget to pick up that plastic bag your peas came in. In high-traffic opaleye areas… pick up one more than you brought.

Happy fishing, Ben

KJ and an opaleye from the Cabrillo Mole

Posted by fishingrod

Thanks for the tips. I always enjoy fishing for opaleye. I might head out to OB Pier this weekend with some peas. Opaleye are beautiful fish.

Posted by bigworm

Cool, thanks for the tips. Yeah, that’s exactly the rig the guy was using. I say the leader was about maybe 4 feet. Also, when using moss is there a preference to which moss to use and how do you bait it? Very good research project you had. Hope you got a good grade.

Amanda and an opaleye from the Cabrillo Mole

Posted by shorepounder

Can’t disagree with Ben’s conclusions on fishing for Opaleye, but read on only if you enjoy light line fishing for smaller game.

Definitely in the Spring and Summer peas work well, but in the cooler times of the year other baits yield better results.

Frozen peas are the only way to go and don’t let them defrost, keep them in a cooler so they stay firm and aren’t as easy for the fish to take off the hook. It may not seem like a big deal, but that extra little time that it takes for them to nibble it off the hook can be the difference between a hook up and a missed fish. Also pick the best peas, no tears or imperfections, use the intact ones and toss the others in the water as chum.

Small hooks are the deal. I believe that a hook with a single pea out fishes a hook with multiple peas on it. I use Eagle Claw circle hooks model l702 in sizes 14 and 16. These hooks work really well and the difference in using a circle versus a normal hook is night and day in Opaleye fishing. My hook-up rates increased greatly once I switched to using circle hooks, and since I release all my opaleye these hooks have prevented the fish from being hooked deep, making releasing a snap. I use to use the Owner mosquitos before and if I didn’t have my Eagle circles I’d be using those instead, very sticky hooks and penetrate the fishies mouth easily.

I always use slip bobbers in the smallest sizes I can depending on fishing conditions and adjust the depth according to what the fish want using just enough weight to balance the float with the smallest split shot from 4-6 inches away from the hook and the other shot a foot above that.

Chumming matters, do it.

Light line is a must, so use the lightest line you can get away with, bigger opaleye are for sure line shy most of the time.

And don’t be shocked if you should happen to catch other fish besides opaleye while using frozen peas for bait. Besides opaleye I regularly catch juvenile and occasionally legal calico and sand bass, black perch, sargo, senoritas, rock wrasse, and garibaldi. Along with those I have caught on a lesser degree, halfmoon, mackeral, smelt, giant kelpfish, sheephead, spotted bay bass, sculpin, kelp perch, and blacksmith perch.

That’s what’s great about fishing saltwater, you never know what will bite your offering and never underestimate the power of frozen peas

Happy fishing! Shorepounder <”))){ Posted by bigworm Hey Shorepounder, Fantastic tips, I can’t wait to try them out. Do you know of any good spots around Ventura or Santa Barbara area? And if possible maybe we can hook up and go opaleye fishing sometime? Just a thought. Regards Posted by shorepounder Hi bigworm, sorry, but I don’t know of any spots up by you. I’m south of you and fish the Redondo, Hermosa, and Manhattan area. Opaleye hang around rocks, kelp, and other structure like pilings, so that’s what you want to target whether it’s off of jetties, shorelines, or in harbors. One good way to find them is to wear polarized sunglasses so you can see down into the water and then just chum a bunch of peas and wait to see if any opaleye come around. Keep moving if nothings happening and repeat till you find some. Not all areas hold them so moving around is key, opaleye school up and usually when you find one there’s more, so covering a lot of water and different areas till you find them is the deal. Also I’m impatient when it comes to opaleye, if I’m not getting bit within 10-15 minutes at most I move on. Finally once you find a good spot that has opaleye, that spot will usually always hold opaleye. Forgot to mention tides. I have always had my best luck on the two hours before and after an incoming tide. At slack tide action always slows, but if I know it’s a spot that holds fish I’ll wait them out until the tide starts to move again. Hope this helps ya out and good luck. Shorepounder <”))){ Opaleye caught by Mahigeer (Hashem Nahid) at the Green Pleasure Pier in Avalon Posted by dompfapops Opaleye are a lot of fun to catch. I’ve spent many happy times with my six sons targeting the beautiful blue eyed nibblers. And pound for pound they are smarter and scrappier than most fish that size. And they do get surprisingly larger than you’d think. The big ones have a large forehead and seem to have a personality that says “I’m older than you, toss me back in.” And I always do throw them back because, frankly, I just don’t like the taste of Opaleye. The way to catch them is, use a very small hook #14 or smaller so the frozen green pea completely hides the hook. Use a bobber and a 2 or 4 lb. leader 3 feet long. Now here’s the secret, WATCH THE BOBBER, it won’t move much. Set the hook at the slightest hint of a movement or all you will get back on the hook is the hollow skin of the pea. That’s right, in a split second, they can suck the meat out of the pea and leave the empty shell hanging on the hook and not even hardly move the bobber! Have fun. I forgot to mention: put a small split shot about 8 inches above the hook so the leader hangs down in the water below your bobber. Posted by squidder When I was a kid long ago (1970′s) on Redondo Beach Pier, I saw an unusual method one guy used to catch opaleye. He would cut open a mussel and insert four small hooks into the meat without cutting the meat out of the shell. Picture four quadrants with hooks in each. Then he would lower the entire thing near one of the pilings where the opaleye tend to feed. Worked really well at the time. I’m sure techniques like this withstand the test of time. Opaleye from the Palos Verde Peninsula Posted by dompfapops Yeah you probably were not near any opaleye. But when you do find a good spot for them take a big bag of frozen peas (they are cheap) and chum a lot. And use a much smaller hook than a #8; they have real small nibbler mouths; use a #12 or 14 hook. As for good spots in the SD area I can’t help you. If my life depended on me finding opaleye in my neck of the woods (LA) I would try the Marineland area of Palos Verdes or the Mole in Avalon.

How to Catch an Opaleye

This is a species of sea chub, which is a family called the Kyposidae. The opaleye feed primarily on algae. They will occasionally eat crustaceans, mollusks, and worms. Opaleye is considered a commercially important game fish. In the spear fishing community, they get a bad name, but they can be fun to catch. They are also referred to as a rudderfish. Across the globe, there are over 18 species of the opaleye. They are not an endangered species.

Their body is oval and laterally compressed. The fish has a small thick-lipped mouth with a short snout at the front of their body. The fin of an opaleye is short and rounded to blunt. The tail fin has a straight margin while the dorsal fin is continuous. The adult opaleye is olive-green to grey-green in color with two to six lighter spots in the middle of their upper back. You may also see a white bar between their eyes, which are opalescent blue-green. On the dorsal surface of a juvenile, it is bluish in color with the ventral surface is a silvery color. They can grow to a maximum length of 27 inches.

Some of the other names that they are referred to by include:

Blue-eye perch

Green perch

Blue bass

Catalina perch

Button bass

Where to Find an Opaleye

You can find the Opaleye in the Eastern Pacific to southern Baja, California. Usually, you will find them in intertidal zones and shallow waters over kelp beds and rocks. The intertidal zone is also known as the seashore that is underwater at high tide and above water level at low tide. You will find Opaleye at depths of 3 to 105 feet. Although there are many species of this fish, only two of them can be found in the waters off Southern California and Mexico.

Opaleye is generally found near rocky areas that are abundant in algae. They will occasionally venture into estuaries. The young opaleye is usually found alongside floating debris near the surface.

To learn more about Pier Fishing for opaleye in California, visit this site.

How to Catch an Opaleye

One thing to remember when you are fishing for opaleye is that they swim in large schools a couple of feet below the surface. Very rarely will you find them dwelling at the bottom or swimming near the surface. You can find opaleye year-round but from season to season, the location will vary. In the cooler times of the year use other baits but in the summer and spring months, use peas as bait. When fishing for opaleye, you can do it from shore or on a pier. Because they are considered an inshore fish, they are rarely caught from a boat.

Best Bait for Opaleye

As mentioned below, a good bait to use to capture opaleye is frozen peas. When using them, make sure that they are not damaged or torn in any way because this is a lightning-fast fish and it will eat the meaty part, leaving you an empty hook with the pea skin still attached. You can also use ghost shrimp, pile or blood worms, moss, mussels, or small crabs.

Best Lures & Tackle for Opaleye

To catch opaleye at the depth they like to swim, you use long slip line floats. When this tackle goes down as the opaleye bites the bait, you need to strike fast to prevent it from rushing into the kelp without being hooked. Make sure that you are using small hooks. One of the best light lines to use is fluorocarbon. The hooks need to be size 6 or smaller. It is easier to catch the younger ones than the older ones. You can attract them by using chum with peas. The school that you attract will generally have a mixture of sizes of opaleye. When deciding on which hook to use, use a circle hook as they do not hook that deeply and cause damage to the fish, making it easier to remove the fish.

Tips and Tactics

Keep some frozen peas in your cooler to use as bait. They need to remain firm so you can put them whole on the hook. The opaleye will have to take the entire pea in its mouth to get it off the hook. When this happens, the hook will penetrate the flesh, allowing you to reel it in.

This is a line shy fish so use a light line that they cannot see.

To catch more opaleye, use a long leader and casting bobber setup.

How to Cook an Opaleye

Opaleye has tough skin so if you do not want to fillet them, you can just cook it over charcoal. This is how you would do it this way. Before you can grill them you will have to gut the fish and clean out the gills. You have to pay special attention to the blood that is under the air bladder, making sure that you get that out. Make sure that you leave the fins and scales on the fish.

One way to make this a tasty fish is to stuff the cavity of the stomach with two green onion bulbs but you can leave the cavity empty. Once the charcoal burns red, you can put the entire fish on the rack. Cook the fish until the skin starts to shrink and crack or the fins burn off. This means that the fish is done. Take it off the grill and peel the skin off. When you do this, the scales should easily come off. Sprinkle the flesh with your favorite seasonings and enjoy.

Opaleye Reproduction

The males and females leave the eggs and sperm in the water to fertilize. They spawn from April to June. The larvae hatch in the water column. The juveniles will stay in the tide pools until they mature.

Predators of the Opaleye

The primary predators of this fish are larger fish and birds. If at all possible, they will swim to a safer area. The juveniles will live in rocky tide pools for protection and at a certain age; they will swim out to deeper water.

Fun Facts about an Opaleye

The opaleye feeds on kelp. They will hold a piece of the plant in their mouth and then twist side to side so they can break a piece off.

Juvenile’s feed on the algae in the tide pools.

They can breathe air when they are out of the water.

Conclusion

The opaleye is a great fish for beginners and experts alike. They are not a sport fish as they do not put up much of a fight when they are caught. If you are looking for something fun to do with family and friends or just want a peaceful afternoon fishing, this would be the ideal fish to fish for. It is a great fish to catch when you are having a father-son weekend camping and fishing.

Just put some frozen peas in a cooler, pack up your rod with a light line and small hooks and head out to your favorite place to fish for opaleye. They are a good tasting fish and several of them would make a great meal on the grill when you get home. You can even bake them in the oven or whatever method of cooking you prefer.

Do you love learning about catching different types of fish? Check out How to Catch a Yellowtail Snapper.

So you have finished reading the opaleye fishing rig topic article, if you find this article useful, please share it. Thank you very much. See more: opaleye fish size, iso fishing rig, opaleye dragon, opaleye perch, opaleye management, opaleye scientific name, opaleye diet, opaleye sushi

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